Norwegian Jewel heads to Asia

Norwegian Cruise Line announced it would be sending the Norwegian Jewel to Sydney from October 2017.

She will be offering 15 voyages including three months of Australian cruises before sailing to Asia.

Highlights of Norwegian Jewel’s inaugural local season comprises seven Sydney round-trip cruises including a 5-day Sydney-Tasmania-Sydney cruise departing 12 November 2017, as well as a 9-day voyage visiting a swathe of burgeoning regional destinations including Eden, Kangaroo Island and Tasmania’s Burnie, departing 14 December 2017.

Norwegian Jewel’s 10 to 16-day Australia and New Zealand itineraries depart between November 2017 and February 2018, with highlights including cruising through New Zealand’s striking Milford Sound and the spectacular Bay of Islands.

Jewel will make her way from Sydney to Singapore on an 18 day adventure departing 20 February 2018 where guests can enjoy the best of Far North Queensland, Darwin, and visit Komodo Island.

Following her Australian season, Norwegian Jewel will visit Vietnam, Japan, Hong Kong, Singapore, China, Korea and more, offering Australian travellers the opportunity to explore some of the best Asia has to offer on a 40-night combination voyage from Sydney through to Yokohama – Gateway to Tokyo.

The Norwegian Jewel can accommodate for around 2,400 passengers and the Australian ship will have local entertainment as well as Cirque Du Soleil shows.

With a wide range of accommodation ranging from inside and oceanview staterooms to family suites and expansive, luxurious suites with 24-hour butler service in The Haven, together with 16 dining options ranging from Teppanyaki to Brazilian Churrascaria with no set dining times or pre-assigned seating.

‘It’s about freedom – that’s our style,” said Steve Odell, Managing Director of Asia Pacific at Norwegian Cruise Line Holdings.

Mr Odell revealed Norwegian almost didn’t come to Australia after there were no slots available at the OPT.

One eventually opened up but he said the line was “a prime example” of why the state government needs to resolve the problems of capacity.

Mr Odell is chair of CLIA, the cruise lines’ representative body.

The line refused to reveal pricing but agreed but it was likely to be more expensive than Royal Caribbean and P&O – suggesting they would not indulge in a price war.

Earlier, executive vice president Harry Sommer said, “Norwegian charges more but offers guests the best food, the best activities and the best service.”

Mr Sommer said it was important that the line communicated the value differences it was offering to the market.